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Cat Escapes No More! Ultimate DIY Cat Fence Hacks Revealed!

DIY-cat-fence

Cat Escapes No More! Ultimate DIY Cat Fence Hacks Revealed!

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Many cat owners allow their feline friends to enjoy the outdoors from time to time. However, it can be challenging to keep them safe and contained, especially if they are curious and adventurous.

One cat owner found that their cat was able to easily climb over their backyard fence, prompting them to seek out solutions to prevent their pet from escaping. In this article, two different methods that were successful in stopping the cat from jumping over the fence will be discussed.

The first method involved using chicken wire that was stapled directly to the fence. The owner purchased two-foot-wide chicken wire from a home improvement store and stapled half of it to the fence, allowing the other half to overhang at the top.

While not the most aesthetically pleasing solution, it effectively prevented the cat from jumping over the fence.

On the other side of the yard where the fence was fully exposed, a second method was used that incorporated chicken wire and two-by-fours to create a more visually appealing solution. The owner found both methods to be equally effective at stopping their cat from escaping.

Problem Identification

Alright, so here’s the deal: The speaker’s cat turned into a fence-jumping pro in the backyard, and it was turning into a risky game for the furry buddy. The fence used to do its job just fine, but curiosity got the best of the cat, and it turned into a fence-climbing ninja.

Now, the speaker tried two different fixes to keep their pet in check. First up, there’s the chicken wire method. They basically stapled that stuff to the fence, which did the trick, but let’s be honest, it’s not winning any beauty contests.

Then, we’ve got the fancier solution involving black PVC-coated chicken wire and those trusty two-by-fours. This one’s like the cat containment system runway model. It’s slicker and sleeker, but it does demand a bit more effort.

Oh, and don’t forget the pro tip: stick that chicken wire behind the plants, so your cat can’t pull a vanishing act. Both fixes worked like a charm, and the cat’s backyard adventures are now drama-free. 🐾🏑✨

First Solution

RELEVANT: Cat Fence for Feline Safety

Materials

For the first solution, the speaker used chicken wire to stop their cat from jumping over the fence. They purchased two-foot-wide chicken wire from Lowe’s and stapled half of it to the fence. The other half was left overhanging at the top. The speaker cut and attached these in about eight-foot sections. The longer sections were sagging too much, so they used a separate wire to hold it up for now.

Installation

The chicken wire was stable directly to the fence. Although it is not the best-looking solution, it is working great. The amount of netting sticking out from the top is enough to stop the cat from jumping over the fence. The speaker used this method on the side of their yard where the plants hide much of the somewhat ugly chicken wire.

Outcome

The chicken wire solution is very effective at stopping the cat from jumping over the fence. However, it may not be the best-looking solution. The longer sections may sag because of the weight, so it is necessary to use a separate wire to hold them up.

Second Solution

Materials

For the second solution, the speaker in the video used chicken wire coated with black PVC, one-foot wide roll, two-by-fours, and metal brackets. The speaker also used one and a quarter-inch wood screws to hold everything together.

Installation

So, here’s how the cat-proof fortress went up: The speaker got those brackets ready, screwed them onto the fence posts after drilling some pilot holes. You know, to make sure that wood doesn’t get all cranky and split on them.

Next, they brought in the two-by-fours, attached ’em to those brackets after drilling a few more pilot holes, and then gave ’em the old screw-tight treatment.

This whole process? They didn’t just do it once and call it a day. Oh no, they did a repeat dance at each fence post where coverage was needed.

Then came the fancy part – the black PVC-coated chicken wire. They stapled it right under those two-by-fours. As they went along, they unrolled the wire and only gave it a snip at the very end. Voila! That’s how the magic happened. πŸͺšπŸͺ›πŸˆπŸ§°

Outcome

The second method of using chicken wire with two-by-fours and metal brackets to hold it up was more aesthetically pleasing than the first method. The chicken wire was not stapled directly to the fence, but rather attached to the two-by-fours. This method completely stopped the speaker’s cat from jumping over the fence. The speaker found that both methods were equally effective at stopping the cat from jumping over the fence.

Additional Measures

The video shows two different solutions to stop a cat from jumping over a fence. The first method involves stapling chicken wire directly to the fence. The chicken wire is two feet wide and is stapled in eight-foot sections. Half of the chicken wire is stapled to the fence, while the other half hangs over the top. This overhanging chicken wire prevents the cat from jumping over the fence. However, the longer sections of chicken wire tend to sag due to their weight, so a separate wire is used to hold them up.

The second method involves using chicken wire and two-by-fours to create a barrier. The chicken wire is coated with black PVC and is not stapled directly to the fence. Instead, metal brackets are attached to the fence posts, and the two-by-four cross beams are attached to these brackets. The chicken wire is then stapled to the underside of the two-by-fours. This method looks better than the first method, but it requires more work.

Both methods are effective at stopping the cat from jumping over the fence. Additionally, the video recommends putting chicken wire behind plants to prevent the cat from climbing out. Overall, these measures are relatively inexpensive and provide a solution for keeping cats safe in the backyard.

Conclusion

In this video, the host’s showing off two cool, budget-friendly fixes to keep their cat from being a fence-jumping champ.

First up, they went old-school and stapled some chicken wire right to the fence. Half of it hung over the top like a curtain of “nope” for the cat, and it did the trick. Especially handy when there were plants around to hide the not-so-glamorous chicken wire. πŸˆβœ‚οΈπŸͺ

The second method involved using black PVC-coated chicken wire and two-by-fours to create a more aesthetically pleasing barrier. The chicken wire was stapled to the underside of the two-by-fours, which were attached to metal brackets screwed onto the fence posts. This method required more work but was effective at stopping the cat from jumping over the fully exposed fence.

The speaker also emphasized the importance of covering all areas where the cat could potentially climb out, such as behind plants. Overall, both methods were equally effective at preventing the cat from jumping over the fence!

🐾 Lisa Illman is the Founder of Kritter Kommunity, LLC! 🏑 She’s got a dapper tuxedo cat who’s been her sidekick since he was a tiny furball. 🐱 Before Finnegan came along, Lisa cared for two FIV-positive cats for over ten years! 🌟 Their love inspired her to create a cat enclosure and a portable catio, giving kitties the purrfect spot to bask in the sun and feel the breeze. β˜€οΈπŸŒΏ

As a kid, Lisa shared her home with a Poodle and a chirpy parakeet! 🐩🐦

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